Much of this information in this Albany Times Union blog is material from
our colleagues at NYAPRS. MHANYS worked with NYAPRS and the Legal Action
Center in advocating for the pre-release waiver. Assembly member
O’Donnell, Assembly Staff, Senate Staff and the Governor’s Office deserve a
great deal of credit for making this waiver possible.

The pre-release restoration for individuals released from correctional
facilities could have positive repercussions for years to come. An approved
waiver will insure that the highest need inmates will receive Medicaid up
to thirty days before community transition. Too many individuals are
released from correctional facilities and have to wait thirty to ninety
days to be approved for Medicaid. During that transition, many of these
individuals end up homeless or back in jail or prison. It is a vicious
cycle but hopefully with an approved Medicaid waiver, Health Home Plus Care
Coordination and an aggressive transition plan upon release including HCBS
Waiver Services, outcomes will be greatly enhanced.

We will be providing more details as soon as the budget becomes official.

Budget provides ‘health homes’ for inmates, Medicaid prior to release

By Rick Karlin, Capitol bureau
on March 31, 2016 at 1:26 PM

Mental health advocates are hailing a number of funding items which appear
to have been kept in the budget including money to develop ”health homes”
for prison inmates who are also mentally ill and have other medical
conditions.

The state for several years promoted the idea of ”health homes” for people
getting services such as Medicaid. These are systems of comprehensive care
for those with chronic conditions.

The budget will also allow inmates with chronic conditions to start getting
Medicaid coverage 30 days prior to their scheduled releases which should
help them obtain medical services and prescriptions they may need as soon
as they are released.

Here are some more details from the state Association of Psychiatric
Rehabilitation Services:

We are extremely pleased that the budget that the NYS legislature and Cuomo
Administration are expected to approve over the next few days will include
several measures for which our members and partners had strongly advocated.
Great thanks are due to the Legal Action Center and MHANYS for the 30 Day
pre-release restoration of Medicaid benefits and to a coalition that
included CHCANYS, the NYS Council, ASAP, the Home Care Association, the NYS
Coalition for Children’s Mental Health Services, Family Planning Advocates,
Medicaid Matters, MHANYS, the Coalition of Behavioral Health Services, the
Schuyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy and the Primary Care Development
Corporation that worked fervently to win approval for the Capital
Infrastructure dollars for non- hospital-based community healthcare
providers.

Restoration of Medicaid Benefits 30 days Prior to Release from Prison/Jail
Authorizes the provision of Medicaid benefits, for ‘high needs” inmates who
were on Medicaid prior to incarceration in a state prison or local jail,
for the 30 days prior to release to pay for transitional services including
medical, prescription, and care coordination services. This is contingent
on NY applying for and getting CMS approval for offer federal share
Medicaid for such services.

Authorization of Criminal Justice Health Homes
$5 million dollars in rate adjustments to health homes participating in a
criminal justice pilot project to establish coordination between the health
homes and the criminal justice system and for the integration of
information of health homes with state and local correctional facilities
for those with serious mental illnesses and two or more chronic conditions,
including substance abuse disorders, or HIV/AIDS.

Restoring Medicaid benefits 30 days before discharge with the option of
enrollment into a specialized criminal justice health home help makes NYS a
national leader in creating a continuum of care for individuals who
frequently relapse and are re-incarcerated, hospitalized or become homeless.

Added to an anticipated additional $1.5 million to further expand Crisis
Intervention Teams, NY will become a national leader in strengthening our
capability to help divert individuals with mental health conditions from
incarceration and to help these individuals to re-enter their communities
with the assistance of improved discharge planning to specialized health
home related supports.
———–

Capital Infrastructure Funding
Provides a minimum of $30 million (out of a total of $200 million) of
funding to the following types of community based health care providers
· diagnostic and treatment centers licensed or granted an operating
certificate
· article 31 licensed or certified mental health clinic
· article 32 licensed or certified alcohol and substance abuse treatment
clinic licensed or granted an
· primary care providers; or
· a certified home care provider
These grants will be awarded without a competitive bid or request for
proposal process for capital grants to health care providers deemed by the
OMH or OASAS commissioner to be a provider “ that fulfills or will fulfill
a health care need for acute inpatient, outpatient, primary, home care or
residential health care services in a community” according to the following
criteria including, but not limited to the extent to which
· the proposed capital project will contribute to the integration of health
care services and long sustainability of the applicant or preservation of
essential health services in the community or communities served by the
applicant;
· the extent to which the proposed project or purpose is aligned with
delivery system reform incentive payment (“DSRIP”) program goals and
objectives
· consideration of geographic distribution of funds;
· the relationship between the proposed capital project and identified
community need
· the extent to which the applicant has access to alternative financing
· extent that the proposed capital project furthers the development of
primary care and other outpatient services;
· the extent to which the proposed capital project benefits Medicaid
enrollees and uninsured individuals;
· the extent to which the applicant has engaged the community affected by
the proposed capital project and
· the manner in which community engagement has shaped such capital project;
and
· the extent to which the proposed capital project addresses potential risk
to patient safety and welfare.

Restoration/Continuation of the EQUAL Program for Adult Home Residents
The “EQUAL program” improves the quality of life for adult care facility
residents by means of grants to facilities that direct the funds in ways
that are approved by Resident Councils.
———-

A Noteworthy Olmstead Related Measure:

Requirement for OPWDD Providers to Provide Alternatives to Sheltered
Workshops
Individuals with developmental disabilities who were employed in sheltered
workshops on or after July first, two thousand thirteen who are not
interested in working or who are not able to work in a provider-owned
business or private business in the community shall, to the extent
practicable and in accordance with the principles of person-centered
planning, be afforded the option of receiving other services of the office,
including, but not limited to pathway to employment, community
prevocational, day habilitation, community habilitation and self-directed
services. The provision of such services shall consider, but not be limited
to, the following factors:
· assessment of the individual’s skills, including social behavior, ability
to handle stress, ability to work with others, job performance,
communication skills, work ethic, and interests;
· assessment of the individual’s situation, including transportation needs
family supports, and physical and mental health; and
· creation of opportunities to explore different community and volunteer
experiences to obtain information that will be used to create a
person-centered plan.

For individuals with developmental disabilities who were employed in
sheltered workshops on or after July first, two thousand thirteen
interested in retirement, OPWDD services shall focus on connecting
individuals to retirement-related activities, including participating in
senior and community center activities, and other local activities for
retirees.

Individuals with developmental disabilities who were employed in sheltered
workshops on or after July first, two thousand thirteen who are not
interested in working or who are not able to work in a provider-owned
business or private business in the community shall, to the extent
practicable and in accordance with the principles of person-centered
planning, be afforded the option of receiving other OPWDD services of ,
including, but not limited to pathway to employment, community
prevocational, day habilitation, community habilitation and self-directed
services. The provision of such services shall consider, but
· assessment of the individual’s skills, including social behavior, ability
to handle stress, ability to work with others, job performance,
communication skills, work ethic, and interests;
· assessment of the individual’s situation, including transportation needs,
family supports, and physical and mental health; and
· creation of opportunities to explore different community and volunteer
experiences to obtain information that will be used to create a
person-centered plan.

For individuals with developmental disabilities who were employed in
sheltered workshops on or after July first, two thousand thirteen
interested in retirement, OPWDD services shall focus on connecting
individuals to retirement-related activities, including participating in
senior and community center activities, and other local activities for
retirees.

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